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May 29, 2012 / John Sheridan

Review: Clawback by Mike Cooper

Amazon, Kindle, Amazon UK

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One of my favourite series out there is written by Peter Spiegelman and features John March (see here) as the black sheep scion of an established Wall St. family and probably the highest compliment I can pay Clawback is to say that it of a similar calibre but with less focus on unravelling a mystery (though that has to be done as well) and probably contains more high intensity action scenes.

The comparison is strengthened by the Wall St focus of Clawback so that they both stalk the same mean streets but given that Silas Cade is ex-military he is well equipped to handle the toughest situations whether he’s armed or not. This also helps to explain the abundance of ex-special forces present on both sides of the divide and their easy familiarity with and access to advanced hardware.

The story opens with Silas recovering money on behalf of a client – a hedge fund manager whose fund is in meltdown from another hedge fund manager by any means necessary. The target of the operation is also in meltdown courtesy of a Madoff style fraud. Silas is an accountant but those skills aren’t relevant to the recovery operation. The only problem being once the funds are recovered, his client dies by a sniper’s bullet and it turns out this isn’t the first hedge fund manager to be murdered. Placed on retainer to find out the truth and to stop it from becoming public knowledge, the suggestion is made that this could be the work of a group that have devised a more effective incentive plan for under performing fund managers – cash on the upside, death on the downside!

Of course nothing is ever that straight forward and with special forces aligned on both sides things are bound to get ugly. For me coming off enjoying the Mike Cooper entry “Leverage” contained in Vengeance (review) on top of the strength of Clawback he is certainly an author I’ll be looking out for again.

My rating is 4.5 out of 5.

Synopsis (Amazon)
After a stint in the Middle East, black ops vet Silas Cade becomes an “accountant”-the go-to for financiers who need things done quickly, quietly, and by any means necessary. Silas is hired by a major player to pay a visit to a hedge fund manager to demand clawback: the mandatory return of compensation paid on a deal that goes bad. But before Cade can tell his client that he got his ten million back, the guy turns up dead.

And he’s not the first. Someone’s killing investment bankers whose funds have gone south. Silas’s scrubbed identity, and his insider’s perspective, makes him the ideal shadow man to track down whoever’s murdering some of the most hated managers on Wall Street. With the aid of a beautiful financial blogger looking to break her first big story, Silas tracks a violent security crew who may be the key to the executions. But as paranoia and panic spread, he begins to wonder: is the threat coming from inside the game-or out?

With breakneck pacing, nonstop action, and cutting edge details of today’s financial intelligence technology, Clawback hurtles to its final twist, a gripping contemporary tale of shady finance, venal corruption, and greed run rampant.

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5 Comments

Leave a Comment
  1. MyBookishWays (@mybookishways) / Jun 4 2012 9:47 pm

    Glad you liked this one! It’s on my TBR…may have to move it up a bit 😀

  2. Maxine / Jun 8 2012 5:41 pm

    I very much enjoyed those 3 John March books by Peter Spiegelman (but the first was by far the best, I thought) – but did he stop writing them? Pity if so. I usually avoid mysteries about ex-military, special ops types as they usually veer into thriller/macho/explosion/etc mode, but I may try this one as you say that it is similar to Spiegelman’s books.

  3. John Sheridan / Jun 8 2012 7:08 pm

    Peter Spiegelman has said that he will be revisiting the John March character in due course but no firm details as of yet. Hope you like this one.

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